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Plusnet Usergroup » All Users - The Open Forum » Announcements » Activation Fee Changes
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Author Topic: Activation Fee Changes  (Read 13779 times)
lmartin

Posts: 1404


Comms Team

« on: May 11, 2007, 02:23:06 pm »

We’re pleased to confirm that, in line with BT Wholesale price decreases, we have reduced the cost of the line activation charge from £47.00 to £40.00. This change was rolled out to new customers signing up and moving house from last Thursday.

Of course, customers can still choose to pay nothing if they stay with us for a year as part of our Free Broadband Setup offer.

In similar news, we have also removed the House Move admin fee that was previously £5.88. So, customers can now move their Broadband choosing to either pay the £40.00 activation fee for their new line, or defer this as part of a similar offer as detailed above. (Full terms here.)
« Last Edit: May 11, 2007, 02:24:42 pm by lmartin »

Liam Martin
PlusNet Comms Team
chillypenguin

Posts: 523


WWW
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2007, 06:34:46 pm »

Liam you "Forgot" to mention that new subscribers and those changing to the new BBYW products have to agree to pay BT's cessation charge of £39.66 should they wish to cancel there ADSL service. (This charge does not apply to migrations, just cancellations.)
 


What is a cessation charge?
'Cessation' is the industry term for 'cancellation'. From 1st May 2007 BT Wholesale will introduce a cessation charge of £39.66 which will apply if:

1   The telephone line which your broadband service is provided on is ceased.
2   Your broadband service is completely cancelled.
3   Your broadband service is cancelled as a result of a house move.


When you'll need to pay the charge
You' ll need to pay the cessation charge of £39.66 if one of the events listed above happen. Cessation charges only apply to Broadband Your Way customers on these Terms and Conditions as of 1st May 2007. If you are a Broadband PAYG Basic, Broadband PAYG, Broadband Plus or Broadband Premier customer you do not need to pay any cessation charges at this stage. However, this may change in the future.



When you don't need to pay the charge
The only event where the charge doesn't apply is if you've requested a move to another provider using a MAC Key.

Chilly

No Polar Bears were harmed in making this post.
"Not free from Faults, nor yet too vain to mend."
petervaughan
Usergroup Member

Posts: 2512


« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2007, 08:59:17 am »

While the above is true, the charge is currently £0 for the next month and under review. See
http://www.thinkbroadband.com/news/i/3078.html

Also I'm not sure if BTW/Tiscali have actually passed on the charge to PN yet anyway so while it is in the T&C for new users/BBYW no-one has been affected by it yet.
chillypenguin

Posts: 523


WWW
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2007, 09:09:41 am »

That's good news.

I could always see the justification for the charge from BT openreach, as engineering time has to be paid for.
But I was surprised (Not) by Ofcom, for allowing this charge when it would become a barrier to changing suppliers. And force unfair charges on to customers, particular those having problems paying their phone bills.

Chilly

No Polar Bears were harmed in making this post.
"Not free from Faults, nor yet too vain to mend."
petervaughan
Usergroup Member

Posts: 2512


« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2007, 12:37:56 am »

I'm not sure how it can be a barrier to changing suppliers as the fee is not applicable to migrations. In fact it would be completely the opposite where it encourages people to migrate rather than do a cease and a new activation with a new ISP.
chillypenguin

Posts: 523


WWW
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2007, 01:55:57 am »

By locking you to ADSL provisioned via a BT phone line, where cable is availbe is one example.

Chilly

No Polar Bears were harmed in making this post.
"Not free from Faults, nor yet too vain to mend."
Laser

Posts: 44

« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2007, 12:18:29 pm »

I could always see the justification for the charge from BT openreach, as engineering time has to be paid for.

I can't see the justification. huh  At the very most, someone will go and pull a plug out of a DSLAM port. Forty quid to do essentially nothing is a joke.

It's nothing more than a stealth increase of the activation charge: Pretend they've dropped the price of activation, but anyone moving house has to pay double. How many people, honestly, cease a broadband connection these days with no intention of getting a new one? A migration, which could well involve engineering and/or admin time, apparently costs nothing. undecided

(The activation charge is excessive for the same reasons, but it could be viewed as incremental cost of the kit that is periodically bought to handle the growing capacity.)
Phil Richardson

Posts: 992

Products Specialist

« Reply #7 on: May 19, 2007, 07:53:11 pm »

Migrations are however automated and require no physical action to take place, other than possibly the ISP inputting an order manually, or service provider with a low volume of customers submitting manual order (ie, BT handle them on the phone or via email).

The changes that take place are backend database changes to the assigned provider, the the realm (portion after the @).

Both of which are database entries and can be automated.

This is also why a ISP will tell you that a migrating due to dis-satisfaction caused by a line fault, will not correct the problem.

Same physical cable, exchange, DSLAM and port in the DSLAM.

Removal from a DSLAM is not as simple as "pulling the plug". A DSLAM has multiple line cards and each line card, will have multiple lines terminated on it.

En engineer will nor attach a customer directly to the DSLAM, but rather to a patch panel.

A professional job must be done to ensure that terminating or removal from the MDF.

Bear in mind, even this automated task for a migration has a charge associated with it.

Phil Richardson
Plusnet Products Specialist
Laser

Posts: 44

« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2007, 11:31:09 am »

I think it's splitting hairs whether the plug gets pulled from the DSLAM or a patch panel or anywhere else. My point was that it would be a two minute job to disconnect someone (and any computer admin, as you have pointed out, is likely to be automated.) And that's assuming they even bother to disconnect the physical connection until they run out of spaces.

These charges are touted as if an engineer needs to get in his van and, especially for a given customer, drive to the exchange, rummage about amongst dusty old bits of kit and carefully thread shiny new wiring half way across the room. Whereas actually, an engineer already on-site will deal with many activations/deactivations in one morning as routine.

I'm not particularly having a go at anyone, and certainly not PlusNet, who aren't the originator of the charges. I am just always really skeptical when I see any business introduce charges to stop using their services. It stinks of the service not being good enough to hold the customer's interest without further "persuasion".
Phil Richardson

Posts: 992

Products Specialist

« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2007, 03:51:11 pm »

One thing to note is, BT Openreach have already been able to demonstaight these charges are valid to the regulators

Phil Richardson
Plusnet Products Specialist
dtomlinson
Plusnet Staff

Posts: 2156


« Reply #10 on: May 20, 2007, 06:03:55 pm »

How many people, honestly, cease a broadband connection these days with no intention of getting a new one?

You may actually be surprised, I know I was when I was answering cancellation tickets. The main reason is that people request a cease is because they are moving abroad, but there are other reasons like moving to a non-BT line.

Regards,

Dave Tomlinson
PlusNet Support
lmartin

Posts: 1404


Comms Team

« Reply #11 on: May 21, 2007, 12:50:22 pm »

I found this article was quite interesting, back in January :-

http://technology.guardian.co.uk/weekly/story/0,,1986983,00.html

Liam Martin
PlusNet Comms Team
cjags

Posts: 29

« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2007, 05:17:12 pm »

I will be moving house soon (probably July).  Does this mean I will get hit for a cease charge as well as the normal move charge?  Currently on BBYW.
dtomlinson
Plusnet Staff

Posts: 2156


« Reply #13 on: May 31, 2007, 06:23:15 pm »

At the moment the cease charge isn't being levied on any accounts. BT Openreach put it on hold earlier this month and intend to announce what's happening with it next month.

As such if you are moving house now there's no charge for the cease but that may change depending on what is announced in June by BT.

Regards,

Dave Tomlinson
PlusNet Support
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